Nutrition

Nutrition for intestinal flora development

Diet to improve gut bacteria?What do your defence system, your metabolism and your psyche have in common? According to research, they are influenced by the bacteria in your intestinal flora, among other things. Nutrition, sleep and many other factors determine the balance of your intestinal bacteria. Above all, you should feed the useful representatives – with the right foods. According to numerous studies, you can only build up a healthy intestinal flora with a balanced and healthy diet. After all, the different types of intestinal bacteria like different foods and they can only multiply if you eat according to their taste. In order to maintain the diversity of your intestinal inhabitants and to support them in their tasks, researchers recommend an equally varied diet to improve gut bacteria.
According to the Stanford University, the more low-nutrient junk food you eat, the fewer bacteria species live in your microbiome.1 On the other hand, a diet rich in dietary fibres has a positive effect on the composition of your intestinal bacteria. For a healthy intestinal flora, you should therefore remove fast food from your diet completely. BIOMES can help you to build up a healthy intestinal flora with the right diet.

Diet to improve gut bacteria? How microbiome and nutrition are related

Did you know that you share your gastrointestinal tract with thousands of species of bacteria? How many you carry and in what quantity varies from person to person. Because nutrition plays a major role in your intestinal flora, your favourite foods help determine the composition of your intestinal bacteria. If you eat

  • probiotic foods, especially bacteria of the species Bacteroides feel comfortable.
  • dietary fibres, the lactobacilli are happy.
  • probiotic food, the bifiobacteria are strengthened.


In short, all types of bacteria in the microbiome are specialized in certain nutrients and utilize other foods. For the intestinal flora and its function, therefore, it depends on the nutritional style.

It is best to supply your intestinal flora with food that is barely processed and cooked as gently as possible. The more natural your food is, the more fibre is contained in it. Food of this kind contains complex carbohydrates that your small intestine cannot break down. This is why fibre-rich food reaches your large intestine, where it promotes the colonisation of beneficial bacteria in addition to intestinal movement. Useful species include not only lactic acid-producing intestinal bacteria, but also immunologically active intestinal bacteria.

What you should eat to build up your intestinal flora

Not only fibre can strengthen your intestinal flora. Based on the results of numerous studies, there are many nutritional tips for building a fully functional microbiome. In 20142, for example, scientists investigated the effects of the vegan lifestyle on the microbiome. For example, a diet without animal products can be beneficial to health. Compared to study participants who ate a mixed diet, vegan participants had more anti-inflammatory bacteria in their intestines. In addition the authors determined a higher variety at intestine bacteria with vegans. However, a balanced diet is also important for this. Only the renouncement of animal products does not represent a healthy nourishing way.

It is therefore better to avoid too much meat and animal fats if you want to build up a healthy intestinal flora. Food of animal origin promotes the settlement of so-called putrefactive bacteria, which produce toxic metabolic products when they multiply excessively. Ideally, the food of your choice is varied, balanced and natural. Because the useful bacteria in your microbiome feed especially on

  • complex carbohydrates from whole grain products, fruit and vegetables
  • high quality fats and proteins from linseed, nuts, soya, sunflower oil and fish
  • Probiotics such as fresh sauerkraut, kefir or miso
  • Polyphenols from tea, berries, cocoa and legumes
  • Liquid


Besides unbalanced nutrition and stress, consumption toxins such as alcohol, lack of exercise, periods of illness and medication are harmful to your intestinal flora.

Build up the intestinal flora with BIOMES: Food adapted to your microbiom

In a disturbed microbiome the healthy balance between the intestinal bacteria is missing. Through diet, exercise and relaxation you can do something good for your intestinal flora and help your beneficial bacteria to regain or maintain their balance. This works better if you know the current state of your microbiome. As the intestinal flora differs from person to person, general nutritional tips only help in moderation when it comes to the development of your microbioma. The scientists at BIOMES will tell you how you should best feed your intestinal flora.
All you need is
  • the INTEST.pro – a test-kit from BIOMES, which enables you to analyse your intestinal bacteria according to the latest biotechnology,
  • a stool sample, which you discreetly pack in envelope included and send back to the researchers at BIOMES,
  • an Internet connection that allows you to access the online dashboard of BIOMES.
After the analysis of the BIOMES scientists, you will receive personalized recommendations. Even food recommendations for your intestinal flora, which can help you to regain your balance.
Analyze your intestinal flora.
Find out what your body needs.


1. Sonnenburg ED, Smits SA, Tikhonov M, et al. Diet-induced extinctions in the gut microbiota compound over generations. Nature 2016:529, 212-215. https://www.nature.com/articles/nature16504

2. Glick-Bauer M, Yeh MC. The health advantage of vegan diet: exploring the gut microbiota connection. Nutrients 2014:6(11), 4822-38. https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/6/11/4822

Plamena Dikarlo

Research & Development

Plamena Dikarlo studied pharmacy at the Free University of Berlin and worked as a pharmacist for many years. Interested in clinical research and patient-oriented approaches, she also studied Consumer Health Care at the Charité University Hospital in Berlin. In her Master's thesis, she finally focused on the topic of prevention and completed further training as a holistic nutritionist at the Paracelsus Heilpraktikerschule in Berlin. She is therefore very familiar with the effects of our diet and various medications on our microbiome.